Search
Close this search box.

A Seamless Belonging

Eco-Centric Development and the Four Foundations of Mindfulness

Insight practitioner and environmental educator Rupert Marques led this EcoDharma Exploration on October 22, 2023. A recording is available below. We welcome your support for this program.

This session also marked the opening of the 2023-24 season of the EcoSattva Training. This online course is revised every year to stay attuned to our rapidly changing situation and to integrate new findings and fresh perspectives.

The view we have of ourselves and our world shapes this world. Frameworks within the Dharma such as the ‘four foundations of mindfulness’ emphasize universal characteristics of our being human and part of a larger field of belonging. Eco-centric models of human identity, born of an intimate observation and participation within the wider natural world also offer a reminder of our deeper embeddedness whilst emphasizing the particular characteristics of our individuality.

An eco-centric wheel of human development invites us to experientially explore how the wider ecological world, and in particular the four seasons as we experience them can serve as a ‘mirror’ for our own maturation, including the four seasons of our human journey through childhood, adolescence, adulthood and elderhood along with the social and ecological developmental tasks associated with these stages.

These two frameworks emphasising the universality and particularity of our location acknowledge the indivisibility of individual and collective flourishing; a seamless belonging in which our particular and unique expression is necessary, a relational Dharma, as Joanna Macy named so eloquently, “World as Lover, World as Self”.

This EcoDharma Exploration took place on October 22, 2023. You can find the recording of this event below.

Anushka Fernandopulle

Rupert Marques has a background in environmental and outdoor education. He has practiced in the insight meditation tradition for over 25 years in Europe, America and Asia, and teaches in Europe and beyond. Rupert also trained with The School of Lost Borders in contemporary wilderness rites of passage and now trains others in this work. He spent 4 years living and working at Ecodharma, a contemplative community in the Spanish Pyrenees dedicated to exploring the role of the Dharma in the movements for social justice and ecological sustainability. He works with individuals and organizations offering a range of retreats and trainings with a particular interest in exploring the intersection of contemplative practice with nature-based practice.

Support this Offering

One Earth Sangha and our featured speakers offer these explorations on a donation basis, with no required registration fee. We invite you to participate in the tradition of offering dana, or generosity. Your support makes these gatherings possible, and any amount offered is greatly appreciated.

You can support Rupert Marques via PayPal by taking the following steps:

  1. Visit https://paypal.com/SendMoney
  2. Log in or create a free PayPal account
  3. Enter  and follow the instructions

We also welcome your support for One Earth Sangha:

Support One Earth Sangha

Recording

Additional Resources

More EcoDharma Explorations

Upcoming

The Dynamic Balance of Yin and Yang, Emptiness and Action, Rest and Engagement, on the Path of Change-Making

What strength might we discover when we connect to often-overlooked virtues such as stillness, rest, and receptivity? On April 28, Deborah Eden Tull leads this investigation into the sacred balance of light and dark within Nature and our own minds.

Upcoming

How might we nourish the ecological self and support its maturation? On May 26, join John Seed and Br. Tenzin (Dr. Alex Anderson) to explore the interwoven teachings and practices of Deep Ecology and Buddhadharma.

Past

In this EcoDharma Exploration on March 24, 2024, Buddhist Minister, Author, and Activist Lama Rod Owens led us in exploring and developing renewed visions for activism based on the recognition that all systems of violence intersect with climate change.