With:

Melanie Nazareth (Christian Climate Action)

Mothiur Rahman (Muslims Declare)

Dr Jasdev Rai (Sikh Human Rights Group)

Alan McFetridge (Centre for Ecological Philosophy)

Katja Behrendt (XR Buddhists)

Format:

You are invited to join a Themed Interactive Discussion Event (TIDE), hosted by the University of Westminster’s Interfaith Advice team, featuring a panel of speakers responding to the question:

What works, and what doesn’t work, in raising awareness of the climate crisis in your faith, spiritual or other community?

Participants will then be invited to explore this question in small groups, joined by a speaker in the role of cultivator, before returning to a plenary discussion to harvest the wisdom, insight and questions that are unearthed. This event is open to students and staff of all faiths and none, with limited spaces available to members of the public.

Context:

In 2021 many have experienced emergence from a time of inner reflection into stark awareness of troubles beyond the pandemic, both societal and environmental. Whilst a sense of global shared experience has arisen in our collective journey through the portal of Covid-19, leaving behind old normalities, we remain aware that the impact of global disease and climate change is being experienced disproportionately, repeating colonial patterns of violence and the theft of resources.

Recent reports illuminate the extent of climate-related anxiety experienced by younger generations in Britain. In other parts of the world, concerns and anticipations have been replaced by grief for what is already lost. The publication of the sixth report by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the upcoming Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow bring us to the gaps; in our own understanding; between words and actions; and the gap in time, between our environment and collapse, which is narrowing.

Some who feel called upon to increase awareness of the climate crisis find support and imperatives to do so within their faith or spiritual tradition, but disagreements over interpretations and methods arise within and between traditions. Please join us in the sharing of wisdom and insights into what works, and what doesn’t work, in raising awareness of the climate crisis within our faith and spiritual communities.